parallax background

Life must go on: On coping with grief by Lucy Ngari

Life must go on – soaring after loss in life
10th September 2018
Life must go on: On loss of a sibling by Lucy Ngari
15th September 2018

When you’re grieving it is both important and difficult to take care of yourself.

Your loss may take away your energy, your appetite and your emotional reserves.

How to take care of yourself

1) Allow yourself to grieve: Often we push the grief away, or tamp it down by distracting ourselves with activities or tasks. Trying to avoid grief only leads to prolonging it — the grief has to be allowed to surface. Unresolved grief, can lead to depression, anxiety, substance abuse and health problems.

2) Express your feelings in a tangible way: This can be done in many ways, depending on your creativity or usual means of expression. You can write about your loss in a journal, or send a private note to the person you’ve lost. You can make a scrapbook, photo album or create an online memorial celebrating that person’s life. You can also get involved in an organization or philanthropy that was meaningful to them, or make a donation in their name.

3) Be physically healthy: Your mind and body are connected, and physical health helps with the emotional healing process. It’s natural to feel lethargic or low energy, but if you’re able to take a walk or a run, it will promote the process. Combat your fatigue with an appropriate amount of sleep, and choose foods that provide you not just with comfort but energy.

4) Don’t judge yourself, or let others judge you: You are allowed to grieve for as long and as deeply as you need to. No one — including yourself — can tell you when to “move on” or “get over it.” It’s okay to be angry, to cry, not cry, or even laugh — you need to allow for moments of joy in your grief, and feel no guilt for having a moment without pain.

5) Find support:- in family, friends, faith based groups, therapists/ counselors. Being able to share your story or your feelings is vital to the healing process.

“Wacha niKwambie”

September 2018 – Lifemustgoon

Soaring after loss – emotional and spiritual wellness

Note:

Lucy Ngari is a Counseling Psychologist based In Kenya. This article is meant to be a guide in healthy grieving. If you need the services of a counselling psychologist to deal with your grief please visit a duly accredited one.

Kwambie Nyambane
Kwambie Nyambane
Kwambie Nyambane is a Business Development Consultant 'by day', a fledgling inspirational blogger 'by night' and a wellness enthusiast championing healthy lifestyle choices. The founder and lead writer of this blog is a Bsc. Food Science and Post Harvest Technology graduate of the Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology, Kenya and holds an MBA in Marketing from the University of Nairobi and is currently pursuing a PhD in Business Administration from the University of Nairobi. Kwambie is a member of Bloggers Association of Kenya. She believes in taking life with a big spoon, seeing the cup always as half full, and enjoying the scenery in this journey called life. Kwambie is married and mother to one beloved son nicknamed "The Champ". She and her family make Nairobi City, Kenya their home. This blog is dedicated to her parents Moraa and Nyambane for their awesome inspiration in her formative years, for being her pillar of strength through life and to her son "The Champ" who represents the generation that came after her. May the nuggets contained in this blog serve many generations, the world over to come.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *